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Found this information on the internet

Uncount nouns

You cannot say a/an with an uncount noun. You cannot put a number in front of an uncount noun. (You cannot make an uncount noun plural.) You use an uncount noun with no article if you mean that thing in general. You use the with an uncount noun when you are talking about a particular example of that thing.

Count nouns

You can put a number in front of a count noun. (You can make a count noun plural.) You can put both a/an and the in front of a count noun. You must put an article in front of a singular count noun. You use a plural count noun with no article if you mean all or any of that thing. You usually use a/an with a count noun the first time you say or write that noun. You use the with count nouns: the second and subsequent times you use the noun in a piece of speech or writing when the listener knows what you are referring to (maybe because there is only one of that thing) You use an (not a) when the next word (adverb, adjective, noun) starts with a vowel sound.

The guideline said "You use a plural count noun with no article if you mean all or any of that thing."

For example, "I read books" means I read all books or any book that I have, doesn't it?

The site didn't mention the rule of "using a single count noun with no article". That is where I confused.

So, it can deduce that "I read book" is grammatically wrong, right?

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    Why do you doubt what the Frankfurrt International School tells you? – P. E. Dant Aug 19 '16 at 17:50
  • @P.E.Dant, the site didn't mention it. – Tom Aug 19 '16 at 17:51
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    No website can list every countable noun! The usage rules apply to all countable and uncountable nouns. – P. E. Dant Aug 19 '16 at 17:53
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    @P.E.Dant, you got me wrong. I mean It didn't mention the rule of "using a single count noun with no article". That is where I confused – Tom Aug 19 '16 at 17:59
  • Do you understand what this means: You must put an article in front of a singular count noun. ? – P. E. Dant Aug 19 '16 at 18:13
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Yes, the sentence is wrong. That website gives some pretty poor guidelines for article usage, but most websites do.

But you did deduce that '*I read book' is wrong.

You usually, but not always, put a determiner before a singular count noun such as book. The indefinite article and definite article are only two of several possible determiners. Other determiners include the personal pronouns and demonstrative pronouns.

'I read books' is rarely going to mean 'all books'. In fact 'books' is most likely going to be a generic noun, saying what type of thing you read. You read 'books' instead of 'magazines' when you have time to read. You can also use 'a book' for the same purpose: 'I read a book now and then to relax'.

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