1

I was reading an English grammar book in which I found:

Roll down: to move something down especially by turning a handle.

In the bold part, I believe a comma is missing. But I am not sure whether this is intentional. Can you explain?

2

A comma is used before especially when especially is used to set off a parenthetical clause, usually at the end of a sentence. See this ELU answer.

No comma is used when especially is not being used to set off a parenthetical clause. Example:

That was an especially fine performance.

  • 1
    "No comma is used when especially is used as an adverb." What else can it be used as? Do you have an example? Isn't "especially by turning a handle" a parenthetical phrase placed at the end of the definition? – Victor B. Aug 20 '16 at 17:48
  • @Rompey - You're right; "especially" is always an adverb. I have edited my answer. – kevinbatchcom Aug 20 '16 at 17:57
  • To have it done with, should a comma be placed before "especially" in the definition? – Victor B. Aug 20 '16 at 18:11

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.