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I have been confused by the following sentence for a while.

Robert explains that being a good banker isn't enough to become rich, one also has to be a good gambler in order to understand the price to pay.

It seems to me that there are two different sentences partitioned by the comma, but the conjunction 'and' was omitted. But according to the rule of compound sentence, the conjunction can't be left out, so I wonder if the word 'and' was left out by the writer? OR it is different grammatical facts?

  • This appears to be a comma splice. Please provide a link to the source if possible. Otherwise, explain the origin of this example. – Em. Aug 21 '16 at 2:42
  • This comes from a short summary of book ' Rich Dad's Guiding to Become Rich' which written by a American – Henry Wang Aug 21 '16 at 2:45
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Your example is not a compound sentence of two independent clauses.
The "also" makes the second part a dependent clause

Robert explains that being a good banker isn't enough to become rich, one also has to be a good gambler in order to understand the price to pay.

Robert explains that being a good banker isn't enough to become rich, (and) one also has to be a good gambler in order to understand the price to pay.

Your two independent clauses are

1) Robert explains that being a good banker isn't enough to become rich.
2) One has to be a good gambler in order to understand the price to pay.

both can be understood independently.

By adding "also" to the second part

One also has to be a good gambler in order to understand the price to pay

it can no longer stand alone and make sense since the reader is left wondering "also what?" which now makes it dependent on the first part.

"And" is not necessary to combine the two as pointed out in the comments, but the meaning and understanding does not change with or without an "and".

  • Thank you, but do you have any references about dependent clause? – Henry Wang Aug 21 '16 at 13:42
  • I have checked the definition of dependent clause, but it seems that the second part is a complete sentence which express meaning. – Henry Wang Aug 21 '16 at 15:10

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