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Rich dad went on to say, "You should treat all debt, good or bad, the same way you treat a loaded gun—with a lot of respect."

For the above sentence, can I place 'as' after 'way' then the sentence will go like this:Rich dad went on to say, "You should treat all debt, good or bad, the same way as you treat a loaded gun—with a lot of respect."

My questions: For this sentence, I think my confusion comes from the usage of 'the same .....as....' and 'the same....that', but I'm can't find a very clear answer from google. Can anyone could explain this? Thanks in advance.

  • The omission of words which are nevertheless understood to be in a clause is called ellipsis. Here, either as or that is omitted after way and can be inserted without changing the meaning. This looks to me like a form of ellipsis. This exact question is discussed at this link, but for some reason ellipsis isn't mentioned! (Google, by the way, is just a collection of things people have written: some correct, some incorrect, and many meaningless; it's not a very good teacher.) – P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica Aug 22 '16 at 2:35
  • So, when as and that followed by a clause, they can be interchangeable. Is that right? – Henry Wang Aug 22 '16 at 6:40
  • Not in every case, but in most. The only rule in English is: To every rule there is an exception. – P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica Aug 22 '16 at 6:41
  • Can you explain what is the most situation? – Henry Wang Aug 22 '16 at 6:58
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For your hypothetical advice,

treat it the same way you treat

the equivalents are

treat it the same way as you treat
treat it the same way as you would treat
treat it the same as you treat

the meanings are the same for all four, the differences are stylistic.

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  • Thank you, but I don't think you've understood my question. – Henry Wang Aug 22 '16 at 6:39
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Yes, you can place "as" immediately after "way" and it would make perfect sense. Both versions of these sentences are perfectly fine. One thing I would change is the beginning. Instead of "Rich dad" it should be either:

  • "Rich Dad went ..." or,
  • "The rich dad went ..."

The first bullet point has "Dad" as a name (and proper noun). This is what the son calls his father. The second bullet point has "dad" as a common noun, and we put "the" before it. However, since we are describing the dad as rich, we put that descriptive adjective in between "the" and "dad": "the rich dad."

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