1

Is there any difference in the meaning of these phrases ? They seem interchangeable to me, any context in which "off" and "from" give different meaning to the verb?

Example:

  • hang the bag from the hook
  • hang the bag off the hook

Thank you.

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  • Welcome to ELU. It is required for questions to present prior research into the topic. Please add what you yourself could find about the differences between the two phrases and why that didn't satisfy your curiosity. You can also have a look at the help center to find out more about good questions. – Helmar Aug 23 '16 at 15:12
  • 2
    "hang the bag on the hook" sounds more standard to my ears. – k1eran Aug 23 '16 at 16:20
  • In that sentence, both 'from' and 'off' seem to indicate that you should not hang the bag 'on' the hook. However, most people would understand what you mean. – MikeP Aug 23 '16 at 17:21
5

I would say hang the bag on the hook, the broken wing was hanging off the aeroplane, the light fitting was hanging from the ceiling and HANG ON FOR DEAR LIFE!, so I suppose that your examples are not really interchangeable after all :)

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