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Ok, 1 teacher of mine once said in a class that "use tongue to a sentence to practice pronunciation" (I am not sure I heard correctly, "tongue to a sentence" or something like that)

For example, to practice /u:/ /k/ & /g/ sound, you can learn to say this sentence out loud

How many cuckoos could a good cook cook if a good cook could cook cuckoos?

My question is that can you give me a similar example but this time is for practicing "N & L sound".

Maybe, "Nood likes nuts like a naughty noob". But seem this sentence does not make any sense.

COuld you come up with a different example of a sentence like that?

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    I suspect the word your teacher used was tongue-twister. Aug 24, 2016 at 1:51
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    Nine nimble nobles nibbled nuts, might help with /n/. You can find thousands of tongue-twister sites, with entries sort by letter. Here is a page with several which are intended to help with /l/. Try a Google search for "tongue twisters for /l/ and /n/". Aug 24, 2016 at 2:10

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First of all, could, good, and cook don't have /u:/, they have /ʊ/, a completely different vowel.

This is /ʊ/: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Near-close_near-back_rounded_vowel
This is /u/: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Close_back_rounded_vowel

Your cuckoo sentence is pronounced:

/haʊ mɛni kʊkuːz kʊd ə gʊd kʊk kʊk ɪf ə gʊd kʊk kʊd kʊk kʊkuːz/

Secondly, those pronunciation-exercising sentences are called tongue twisters. Tongue twisters are phrases contrived to be difficult to pronounce as you are exposed to it, such as the famous "She sells sea-shells on the sea-shore."
Now, your direct question: "Make a tongue-twister for /n/ and /l/", here's what P.E. Dant said in your comments:

Nine nimble nobles nibbled nuts, might help with /n/. You can find thousands of tongue-twister sites, with entries sort by letter. Here is a page with several which are intended to help with /l/. Try a Google search for "tongue twisters for /l/ and /n/".

What is "tongue to a sentence" of N & L sound?

The point of using tongue twisters for pronunciation exercises is to be contrived to be hard to pronounce so that you can improve on them, and consequently the sounds the twister contains. I think you can make up your own, as you've already done.

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  • It's very strange to see a link to a question in the answer to the same question. Is this an intentional Godëlian ploy which is too subtle for my addled mind? Aug 24, 2016 at 6:08
  • Or /ˈkuːkuːz/, with the same vowel in both syllables.
    – user230
    Aug 24, 2016 at 11:58
  • @P.E.Dant I was linking to your comment! Aug 24, 2016 at 17:15
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Got it

  1. You’ve no need to light a night-light

    On a light night like tonight

    For a night-light’s light’s a slight light

    And tonight is a night that’s light

    When a night’s light like tonight’s light

    It’s really not quite right

    To light night-lights with their slight lights

    On a light night like tonight

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