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I don't understand the structure of the bold part of the sentence below. It's from Persuasion by Jane Austen.

Mr Shepherd, a civil, cautious lawyer, who, whatever might be his hold or his views on Sir Walter, would rather have the disagreeable prompted by anybody else, excused himself from offering the slightest hint, and only begged leave to recommend an implicit reference to the excellent judgement of Lady Russell, from whose known good sense he fully expected to have just such resolute measures advised as he meant to see finally adopted.

Might I have an explanation.

  • Thank you very much for your help. I really appreciate it. – Li Xiaodong Aug 24 '16 at 5:19
  • This is a difficult passage. Most native speakers would be unable to parse it. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 24 '16 at 11:13
  • The unusual thing about the construction there is that we encounter from not by, and thus we have the source of the advice (her good sense) rather than the advisor herself in agent position. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 24 '16 at 12:05
  • Let's suppose Lady Russell is a fashion consultant who helps her clients choose items from their vast wardrobes, and Mr Shepherd wants Sir Walter to dress appropriately: "....from whose good fashion sense he fully expected to have such apparel suggested as he meant to see finally worn." – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 24 '16 at 12:14
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OK, let's break it down. "...from whose known good sense he fully expected to have just such resolute measures advised as he meant to see finally adopted"

The meaning overall is that the protagonist is expecting Lady Russell to speak out and recommend exactly what he wanted to do anyway.

"he ... expected to have just such resolute measures advised" - he expected that exactly those sort of actions would be advised.

"such ... measures as he meant to see ... adopted" - those actions which he wants to happen. Here 'meant' is being used in an older sense than you generally encounter it these days. It is used in the sense of "I mean to do x!" to show that your intention is to do x.

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  • Does the sentence "from whose known good sense he fully expected to have just such resolute measures advised" mean "He fully expected to have just such resolute measures advised from the known good sense of the excellent judgement of Lady Russell"? – Li Xiaodong Aug 24 '16 at 5:22
  • the good sense is an attribute of Lady Russell herself. Whose good sense; whose implies an attribute of a person. He recommends reference to the judgement of Lady Russell. He has faith in the good sense of Lady Russell . – djna Aug 24 '16 at 12:13
  • @djna Thank you very much for your help. I really appreciate it. – Li Xiaodong Aug 26 '16 at 14:28

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