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He left the band out of his own decision.

I'm trying to say that It was his own decision to leave the band. Is this ok to say?

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  • I'm trying to say that It was his own decision to leave the band.
    – Chris
    Commented Aug 25, 2016 at 6:05
  • Your comment is actually a better way to say this. Alternatively: Leaving the band was his own decision. He left the band, which was his own decision. He left the band of his own volition. So the simple answer to your question is NO. ;)
    – Joe Dark
    Commented Aug 25, 2016 at 8:51
  • Your sentence is totally fine, grammatically, but it just means he didn't let the band be part of his decision. It doesn't mean that the decision was leaving the band. (To be left out would be a phrasal verb here, so "leave" doesn't actually mean "to leave.")
    – Emmabee
    Commented Aug 25, 2016 at 16:48
  • @JoeDark Volition sounds so super weird and formal or is it just me? I've never heard that before.
    – Chris
    Commented Aug 25, 2016 at 16:51
  • Your sample sentence can be interpreted in several ways: he made a decision to depart from the band, or he made a decision affecting the band and didn't consider the other members' input.
    – fixer1234
    Commented Feb 27, 2017 at 0:03

2 Answers 2

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The complement of out of is something more specific than "his own decision". It must be a motive.

He left the band out of jealousy.

He left the band out of boredom.

He left the band out of a desire to strike out on his own.

He left the band of his own volition. He was not kicked out.

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  • He left the band out of his own volition. :P Commented Mar 29, 2017 at 0:16
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Out is not needed:

He left the band of his own decision.

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  • What does "of" mean in this sentence ? What are its synonyms? Commented Aug 25, 2016 at 15:52
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    In learning a foreign language I was once advised to stop trying to "translate" prepositions and rather just learn where they're used and I've found this advice generally pretty helpful... prepositions do weird things, and the idea of synonyms for them usually doesn't work. In this context, "of" links something to its cause. It's the same way we use it in "I would die of shock," or "she did it of her own free will." If it helps you to remember you can think of it as a shortening of "He left the band [because] of his own decision" but I'm not certain it actually is.
    – Emmabee
    Commented Aug 25, 2016 at 16:53
  • The easiest way for me to remember what 'of' does is to recall that 'of' is possessive. So 'of' his own decision is the only right preposition. In German, though, we put the word 'out' in front of 'of' to emphasize that it was his own decision. I see why it is ambiguous in English in this sentence.
    – Chris
    Commented Aug 25, 2016 at 20:04

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