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  1. Sixty people, most of whom were females, liked the party.
  2. Sixty people, most of them were females, liked the party.

  3. The animal, which is sick, needs treatments.

  4. The animal, that is sick, needs treatments.

Are all of those sentences correct? If any of them is wrong, please explain.

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These would be my approaches the first sentence:

Sixty people, most of whom were females, liked the party
Sixty people, most of them female, liked the party
Sixty people, mostly women, liked the party.

I am not prepared to even consider the second sentence because, without context, it is needlessly complex. here is a more sensible way of writing it.

The sick animal needs treatment.

The problem with made-up sentences is that it's hard to tell whether they are unnatural because they are made-up, or unnatural because they are grammatically wrong. It would be much better to look for real examples of a particular usage using google books:

The house is packed with people of all ages, most of whom do not have Parkinson's Most of me

I've provided a very supportive book introduction, so most of them feel confident to try reading the book. making the most of small groups

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I would say all four of your sentences are correct and understandable.

Sixty people, most of whom were females, liked the party.

is fine.

Sixty people, most of them were females, liked the party.

is slightly awkward but

Sixty people liked the party and most of them were females.
Sixty people liked the party. Most of them were females.

would sound more natural.

Commas are not necessary in your last two sentences

The animal which is sick needs treatment.
The animal that is sick needs treatment.

and treatments should be singular even if the animal needs more than one type of treatment.

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  • #Peter "Sixty people liked the party, most of them were females " This sentence seems to be incorrect! I am copying a rule from a website - As follows : A quantity phrase with whom is placed at the front of the modifying clause and then the clause is placed directly after the noun it modifies. "California has a lot of visitors , most of whom visit Disneyland. " – dz420 Aug 26 '16 at 9:59
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    Sixty people liked the party, most of them were females. is a comma-splice. – kiamlaluno Aug 26 '16 at 10:14
  • By using "them" the phrase becomes independent, either a coordinating conjunction or a new sentence is necessary to stay away from a comma splice. That's why using "them" sounds better at the end. – Peter Aug 26 '16 at 19:18
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The words in all four sentences could be seen as correct, depending on your meaning. I dislike using the sterile and biological term "females" to refer to women, but leaving that aside for the moment:

Sixty people, most of whom were females, liked the party.

This is a correct dependent clause where "whom" refers to people.

Sixty people, most of them were females, liked the party.

This is a little abrupt-sounding because "Most of them were females" is a complete sentence on its own. Inserting a complete sentence as a parenthetical in another sentence isn't impossible. In writing, it would be better to set it off with em dashes, though.

Your last two questions on that vs. which are more interesting. Which can be used to introduce an independent or a dependent clause. That can only be used to introduce a dependent clause. Most style guides would tell you not to use which to introduce a dependent clause. The commas matter, too. If it's an independent clause, it needs the commas, but the commas are technically incorrect in the one with that. Your examples are especially interesting, though, because they are a good example of exactly when it makes a difference when you use that or which. Here is how I would be most likely to read the following:

The animal, which is sick, needs treatments.

I would be most likely to take this to mean that a specific animal needs treatments because it is sick.

On the other hand, I would read the following differently:

The animal that is sick needs treatments.

I would take this to mean that the specific animal that happens to be sick needs treatments, but the animals that are well don't need treatments.

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