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I still have a question about the sentence "from whose known good sense he fully expected to have just such resolute measures advised as he meant to see finally adopted" from the novel "Persuasion" that was written by Jane Austen.

https://ebooks.adelaide.edu.au/a/austen/jane/a93p/chap2.html

Mr Shepherd, a civil, cautious lawyer, who, whatever might be his hold or his views on Sir Walter, would rather have the disagreeable prompted by anybody else, excused himself from offering the slightest hint, and only begged leave to recommend an implicit reference to the excellent judgement of Lady Russell, from whose known good sense he fully expected to have just such resolute measures advised as he meant to see finally adopted.

Below is the sentence about which I still have a question.

from whose known good sense he fully expected to have just such resolute measures advised as he meant to see finally adopted

  1. Does "from whose known good sense he fully expected to have just such resolute measures advised" mean "he fully expected to have just such resolute measures advised from Lady Russell's well-known good sense"?
  2. Which meaning of the word "measure" is used in the highlighted sentence?
  3. Which meaning of the word "as" is used in the sentence "as he meant to see finally adopted"?

Thanks a lot for everyone's help in advance.

marked as duplicate by Alan Carmack, Nathan Tuggy, ColleenV, P. E. Dant, M.A.R. ಠ_ಠ Aug 27 '16 at 7:18

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I think that "from whose known good sense he fully expected" means that his expectation was based on Lady Russell's reputation for good judgement. But is also possible that Austin means that the ideas will arise from her good judgment.

The word "measure" here means "an action taken to achieve some purpose".

The word "as" here indicates equivalence. He believes that if they ask Lady Russell for advice she will tell them to take certain steps to deal with the problem. These steps will be essentially the same as what he wants to see done.

So the whole thing in more modern English means:

who as a woman of good judgement would be sure to advise them to take decisive steps to deal with the situation, the kind of steps which he would have to make them take sooner or later

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