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May I drop "is" in constructions like "as is shown by the example of..."?

On the one hand, such reduced variants can be met even in Wikipedia. But on the other hand, I don't quite understand its grammatical structure.

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    Rather, "as is shown by" is an "expanded" variant! The verb "is" is superfluous in the construction you present, and so is not omitted in "as shown by the example." This is a common and proper use of as in its rôle as an adverb with the meaning "in the manner." E.g.: She sang as promised. He left as agreed. Aug 29, 2016 at 19:37
  • Isn't it just a regular passive voice? "The body's mass is constant as was established by Newton" One cannot replace "at" here by "in the manner", I think
    – Serguei
    Aug 29, 2016 at 20:29
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    The clause is in the passive voice, yes. "Was" could be seen as similarly superfluous in that example. I wouldn't write it this way, but I wouldn't mind reading The body's mass is constant in the manner established by Newton. @StoneyB may like to weigh in here, though, because as is a contentious little fellow. He may make the case for an ellipsis of "is." (Also, the comma is our friend here: The body's mass is constant, in the manner established by Newton. ) Aug 29, 2016 at 20:48
  • @P.E.Dant nudge your comments seem to be enough for an answer and the upvotes on this question indicate some interest in it.
    – ColleenV
    Aug 30, 2016 at 11:30
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    Never trust any sentence you find on Wikipedia to be grammatically correct. Most of them are, but there are many that are horrendous. Aug 31, 2016 at 23:44

1 Answer 1

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Rather than being a reduced variant, as is shown by in your example "as is shown by the example of" is an expanded variant!

The verb is is superfluous in the construction you present, and so is not omitted in as shown by the example. This is a common and proper use of as in its rôle as an adverb with the meaning "in the manner." See Dictionary.com, definition 4: She sang as promised. He left as agreed.

Your example phrase could thus be written as:

...in the manner/as is shown by the example of...

In commentary, you suggested another example:

The body's mass is constant as was established by Newton.

Likewise, "was" is superfluous here, and the sentence could be written as:

The body's mass is constant in the manner/as was established by Newton.

It may be possible to make the case for an ellipsis of the verb "is" (as your question suggests) but many writers prefer a solution which uses the fewest words.

p.s.: The comma clarifies the meaning of either usage:

The body's mass is constant, in the manner established by Newton.
The body's mass is constant, as (was) established by Newton.

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