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What does the average person that goes mean in the following quote from CNN News?

Asked about Trump's health, Bornstein told NBC: "I don't think he's in any better or worse (shape) than the average person that goes and exercises every single day," he said. "Doesn't smoke, doesn't drink -- and that's simply the best advantage you can have to live -- and he's got a good family history."

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    To "go and exercise" is a single action meaning about the same as "to exercise". – DJClayworth Aug 29 '16 at 0:18
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    According to The Free Dictionary, '[The] phrase [go and] is an intensifier, that is, it heightens the action indicated by the verb that follows it.  For example, Don't go and eat all the leftover chicken is stronger than "Don't eat all the leftover chicken."  ...  Sometimes the and is omitted, as in Go tell Dad dinner is ready, ...' – Scott Aug 29 '16 at 7:34
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    I would interpret that as 'taking the time to exercise (for the specific purpose of exercise)'. – Keep these mind Aug 29 '16 at 16:17
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Combining the useful comments by DJClayworth and Scott into an answer, since comments are ephemeral.

To "go and exercise" is a single action meaning about the same as "to exercise".

Go andTFD

This phrase is an intensifier, that is, it heightens the action indicated by the verb that follows it.

For example, "Don't go and eat all the leftover chicken" is stronger than "Don't eat all the leftover chicken." ...

Sometimes the and is omitted, as in "Go tell Dad dinner is ready", or "Go fly a kite", colloquial imperatives telling someone to do something.

  • It needs pointing out that the two answers show different usages, and it's DJClayworth's (not the intensifier) that applies here. – Edwin Ashworth Aug 29 '16 at 16:56
  • @EdwinAshworth I see. Can you edit this answer to make it better? :) – NVZ Aug 29 '16 at 16:57
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    If I were doing a real treatment on it, I'd have to mention the related phase constructions (as Collins Cobuild calls them) (and which DJClayworth's 'single action' overlaps to a fair degree) like 'go shopping', 'go fishing', 'go walking'. But these phase 'go + ing-form' usages do carry the sense of going [out?] somewhere to do whatever it is. In the 'go and infinitive' usage here, I'd say there's less of the 'going out to ...' thrust, but still a little. The emphatic usage is far more common (He's [only] going to go and resign!), as is the sequential usage (I'll go [there] and see). – Edwin Ashworth Aug 29 '16 at 18:59
  • The reason why I didn't post this as an answer is that I didn't want to have to defend it. I believe that the "chicken" example uses (at least) approximately the same meaning as the "exercise" quote. And the omission of the "and" is idiomatic. But I'm concerned that the last two examples are really only words being used together: "Go [to where Dad is, or at least a place from which he can hear your voice] and then tell him dinner is ready," and "Go [to a place outside (where the wind reaches you) and that has enough open space that you can run around] and fly a kite. – Scott Aug 30 '16 at 3:10

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