1

I am trying to say the following thing : "Even though this font is my favourite, it will not be used anymore".

Is any of the following four sentences correct?

This font, although my favourite, will not be used anymore.

This font, though my favourite, will not be used anymore.

This font, even if my favourite, will not be used anymore.

This font, if my favourite, will not be used anymore.

My guess is that the first two sentences are correct and make sense, that the third one is incorrect but could be understood (as in "this foreigner does not speak English very well but I understand him"), and that the fourth one is not only incorrect but also has a meaning opposite of the one I want to convey.

However, I am not sure that though or although can be used without being followed by a verb. Can anyone enlighten me on this point?

  • #1 is grammatical and idiomatic nowadays. #2 is also OK. #3 would often have "even if it is" although the "it is" is not required. #4 is also ok, though your example is not very natural. This font, if inexpensive, has other drawbacks unrelated to price, which make it a poor choice. ... These are all forms of concession. You forgot albeit. :) – Tᴚoɯɐuo Aug 30 '16 at 11:09
  • I agree with Alexandre and I think #4 is unclear and doesn't necessarily mean the same thing as the others. The others state definitely that this font will not be used anymore, despite it being the favorite. #4 states that the font will not be used anymore IF it's the favorite, which implies the possibility that it's not. – stangdon Aug 30 '16 at 17:10

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.