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I was looking at the meaning of call, one meaning says

(transitive) If you call somebody somewhere, you ask or tell them to come there.

One sample usage is

My boss called me to his office and explained the problem.

In the afternoon she called me to the cafeteria to discuss the issue.

Let's say my colleague calls me and asks me to be at a particular spot at 2 o'clock, So I at 2 go to that place and wait for him to show up. Say my other friend finds me there and asks me what I am doing there. So, can I say

X(my friend) called me here to meet him.

My question is that does here convey the message that my friend asked me to be at a particular point, Instead of saying that he called me at this point say my desk or my house?

  • Yes sure it does. 'coz you're already there. – VijayaRagavan Sep 13 '13 at 7:29
  • The sentence can be like, 'He asked me to meet him here'. – VijayaRagavan Sep 13 '13 at 7:42
  • @VijayaRagavan What do you mean, "because you're already there"? What does that have to do with the OP's question? – WendiKidd Sep 13 '13 at 13:09
  • This is just perverse conflation of call = contact by telephone and call = summons to appear. – FumbleFingers Sep 13 '13 at 14:48
  • @WendiKidd: OP by saying 'here', he is in the place where his friend asked him to be. So it conveys the message. – VijayaRagavan Oct 7 '13 at 5:36
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Smart question! I like it.

The specific wording you've used means he asked me to be in this particular place, but if you meant to say he called me on the phone you could just change the wording around.

My friend called me here to meet him.

To call someone [somewhere] means to ask that someone come to a certain place. And that's what you've said here; your friend called you here to meet him. However if we change the wording a bit:

My friend called me and asked me to meet him here.

Now this is referring to the actual phone call. My friend called me means that he picked up the phone and dialed your number. Then you describe what he said to you when he made that call: he asked me to meet him here.

So there's no ambiguity in the sentence you posed, because we express these two concepts a bit differently.

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