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I know that "approach to" is a prepositional phrase that it requires a present-participle verb following.

He approach to transitioning students from high school to university.

But, why not "going to"?

I'm going to meet you.

Aren't they are same transitive verbs and used to express a movement or moving action? How can I actually use the "to" as an infinitive marker or preposition ?

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1) I know that Approach to is a preposional phrase that it requires a present-participle verb following it.

Comment: No, approach to is not a prepositional phrase. It is a noun plus to. /His approach to explaining this problem is straight forward/.

2) He approach to transitioning students from high school to university But, why not going to?

Comment: approach as a verb: He approaches students transitioning from high school to university. No /to/.

Compare the verb form to the noun: His approach to teaching is very old fashioned. Approach as a verb does not take to: They approached the man from behind.

I'm going to meet you. Aren't they the same transitive verbs and used to express a movement or moving action? How can I actually use the "to" as an infinitive marker or preposition?

Answer: No, in the form /going to + verb/, going to expresses a future.

I'm going to leave now. It is not introducing a prepositional phrase.

Summary: going to expresses a future and is followed by any verb: going to see, going to do, going to think

approach as a verb does not take /to/. Approach as a noun takes to but is not a prepositional phrase. It's just a preposition used with the noun: A person's approach to life. It is used to show a direction or purpose.

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