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Suppose a stick rotates as shown in the picture, what are called the positions shown with numbers. Or how do you describe these positions by some words? Specially the number 1,

can I say "the number one is horizontally aligned"

or maybe just "the number one is in horizontal position"?

Moreover, it's not much a formal mathematics question.

enter image description here

  • Are you asking for a term that distinguishes 2 and 4 from all of the others? Maybe "angled" or "diagonal" or "at 45 degrees". – stangdon Sep 6 '16 at 14:53
  • You might also need to consider positions 6 and 8, which in terms of slope are the same as 2 and 4 respectively. – djna Sep 6 '16 at 14:57
  • Informally: horizontal, vertical and diagonal might convey the idea. For a more precise explanation I would probably resort to mathematics: specify a centre of rotation and angles of rotation of 45, 90, 135 and 180 degrees. – djna Sep 6 '16 at 15:02
  • @ahmad I'll let you decide but since this looks similar to a circle, those increments look like arcs of a circle. regentsprep.org/regents/math/geometry/gp15/circlearcs.htm AND mathwords.com/a/arc_circle.htm – Arch Denton Sep 6 '16 at 15:17
  • @stangdon No, I meant the first one, I modified my question. – Ahmad Sep 6 '16 at 15:19
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Number 1 can be called flat, horizontal, or 'laying down'. You can also refer to it as the one on top.

Number 3 would similarly be called upright, vertical, or 'standing up'.

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If you don't need to know with precision exactly where these intermediate positions are, you could refer to them as just that - 'intermediate positions'. Not sure if this is what you are looking for.

  • Thank you, however I meant more the number one position – Ahmad Sep 6 '16 at 15:30
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The positions could be described by the points of the compass. Going clockwise : North, North-East, East, South-East, South, etc.

If there were 12 sticks you could use the clock positions : 1 o'clock, 2 o'clock, etc.

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  • "Number one is in the north position."
  • "Number two is is in the northeast position.

or

  • "Number one is on top."
  • "Number two is in the upper right".

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