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I am a bit confused if I should use a comma in the folowing sentence:

We can use this assumption since in our system, the rewards are bounded.

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    It's entirely a stylistic choice whether to put commas around the [optional] clause in our system, but you'd have to use both or neither. Remember that commas really do nothing except reflect pauses in spoken contexts. Since you wouldn't speak the sentence with just one pause after system, you don't write a single (unpaired) comma there. – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Sep 7 '16 at 20:32
  • You can use no commas: We can use this assumption since in our system the rewards are bounded. You can also use two commas: We can use this assumption since, in our system, the rewards are bounded. You could also separate the two clauses with the comma: We can use this assumption, since in our system the rewards are bounded. But the comma should not be used as in your example. – P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica Sep 7 '16 at 20:34
  • @FumbleFingers : That looks like an answer, not a comment. – sammy gerbil Sep 8 '16 at 5:13
  • @P.E.Dant : That looks like an answer, not a comment. – sammy gerbil Sep 8 '16 at 5:14
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Quote: The main thing to aim for is clarity and readability.

You should ask yourself: Do you think a comma should be there? Is the sentence easier to read and understand with or without one?

I agree with @FumbleFingers. You should either place a comma before and after the [optional] clause or place no commas at all!

Your sentences is incorrect as is. Possible choices are (according to @P.E. Dant's comment):

  • We can use this assumption since in our system the rewards are bounded.
  • We can use this assumption since, in our system, the rewards are bounded.
  • We can use this assumption, since in our system the rewards are bounded.
| improve this answer | |
  • I guess your second choice We can use this assumption since, in our system, the rewards are bounded. builds the clearest sentence, so is the question of the OP, IMO. +1 – Kentaro Aug 21 '17 at 5:00

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