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can I ask questions in this way?

"What food made in that factory made you sick?"

"what kind of man-eating animals living in the reality are the most dangerous?"

or say:"You should know how terribly harmful the food is!"

  • The answer is probably Yes, but what exactly is the question? Note that living in the reality doesn't seem to be idiomatically valid. What's it supposed to mean? – FumbleFingers Reinstate Monica Sep 7 '16 at 20:26
  • Thanks so much for your help! Someone told me you can't put too many modifiers in the structure, is that true? Do these two sentences make sense or not? – moyeea Sep 7 '16 at 20:27
  • Those are all fine. The only limit on the number of modifiers that may be attached to any noun is the limit imposed by the reader's tolerance. – StoneyB on hiatus Sep 7 '16 at 20:53
  • I sense the germ of Squishy Style... – P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica Sep 7 '16 at 21:00
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    @P.E.Dant All style is squishy. – StoneyB on hiatus Sep 7 '16 at 21:37
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You can ask what + noun because what is an adjective modifying the noun. Furthermore, "What food made in the factory" is a noun clause used as the subject of the sentence. Noun clauses act as nouns and are usually introduced with words like that, what, whatever, how, who, etc.

"What food made in that factory made you sick?" [the direct object of the verb is "sick" and the indirect object is "you."]

What. adj.

a —used as an interrogative expressing inquiry about the identity, nature, or value of a person, object, or matter <what minerals do we export>

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/what


"What kind of man-eating animals living in the reality are the most dangerous?"

What | kind | of man-eating animals | living | in the reality | are | the | most | dangerous

Subject: kind

verb: are

predicate adjective: dangerous

In addition to the subject, verb, predicate adjective, and the adjective "What," there are two prepositional phrases, one present participle, and one adverb in the sentence.

Instead of saying "in the reality" you might want: "in the present" or "at the present time."


You should know how terribly harmful the food is!

Here the direct object is a noun clause, but unlike your question, here it is used as a direct object [recall, a direct object is a noun or pronoun that receives the action of the verb]

You | should know | how terribly harmful the food is [the food is terribly harmful; it is how harmful, where "how" modifies the verb in the clause "is."

How. adv.

: in what manner or way : by what means

: for what reason

: to what degree, extent, or amount

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/how

Noun clause

http://www.studyandexam.com/types-of-subordinate-clause.html

See page 99

http://images.pcmac.org/SiSFiles/Schools/AL/HooverCity/SpainParkHigh/Uploads/Forms/Start%20Holt%20Handbook%2010.pdf

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