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Being provided with job opportunities or a stable career will help me financially and help support my family in the future.

Can we start a paragraph with the word "being" and is this sentence correct?

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    Yes, you can. Non-finite clauses headed by "being" pop up quite often, sometimes as subject as in your example, and sometimes as supplementary adjunct, as in "Being an ex-police officer, he was the obvious choice for the position of head of security".
    – BillJ
    Sep 10, 2016 at 14:55
  • Being poor sucks. Sep 10, 2016 at 16:15

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Not only is it fine to use in the way BillJ points out in his comment to your question, but it is not only used as a gerund. It is often used to introduce a clause in the form "being that" (see discussion in the AHD section of TFD).

Usage Note: Being that is sometimes used as a synonym for considering that or seeing that to introduce a clause, as in Being that it's a holiday, I let the kids sleep late. While this construction has seen widespread use in American regional English, the Usage Panel does not much care for it in more standard contexts. In our 2006 survey, 71 percent of the Panel found the above example unacceptable. Some 83 percent rejected the sentence Being that he has never attended law school, it's strange that he's giving legal advice.

Note that simply because a majority of a "usage panel" rejects a usage does not mean that the usage doesn't occur. It does, and quite often.

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  • Being that I'm a Northeasterner, I think the usage panel can take a flying leap.
    – stangdon
    Sep 10, 2016 at 16:27
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Yes, you can. Non-finite clauses headed by "being" pop up quite often, sometimes as subject as in your example, and sometimes as supplementary adjunct, as in "Being an ex-police officer, he was the obvious choice for the position of head of security".

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