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Which of the following sentences are correct?

I’ve been falling behind in my work.

I’ve been falling behind with my work.

I’ve been falling behind on my work.

I’ve seen all three sentences written in different places, so I’ve gotten a bit confused. Are they all acceptable? Is any one preferable over the others?

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  • Depends on the context and what noun occurs in the prepositional phrase. All three prepositions are possible. Commented Sep 14, 2016 at 12:36
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    @Alan Carmack: Can you think of any contexts where any one of OP's three sentences would be either more or less appropriate than the alternatives? I can't. Commented Sep 14, 2016 at 12:40

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All three are grammatically correct, and all three could be understood without difficulty.

I would use "falling behind with" in this context. When speaking of an activty, use "with". Google gives some examples:

In 1941 America was falling behind with wartime production schedules

this child is suddenly falling behind with the academic work

many people are falling behind with their mortgage payments

On the other hand use in when speaking of a place, perhaps metaphorically.

Japan [...] is now falling behind in all areas.

Torsten [...] is already falling behind in school.

The UK is falling behind in treatment and scientific advances

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  • Your last example "The UK is falling behind in treatment and scientific advances" is an activity. Commented Jun 21, 2017 at 12:42
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    Metaphorically, "treatment and scientific advances" is a region of medical practice, hence a metaphorical place. On the other hand, if a person were not taking their medicine regularly you would say that they were "falling behind with their treatment".
    – James K
    Commented Jun 21, 2017 at 15:55

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