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Please note that I'm not a native speaker.

Take this sentence:

Even if there would have been sufficient eggs — which there wasn’t — he would need other stuff sooner or later.

Is the wording "which there wasn't" grammatically correct and would a native speaker understand that, in fact, there were not sufficient eggs?

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    Should be "which there weren't" - eggs is plural - you caught that yourself in your last sentence: "Is the wording "which there wasn't" grammatically correct and would a native speaker understand that, in fact, there were not sufficient eggs? :-) – Kristina Lopez Sep 14 '16 at 17:19
  • "Sufficient eggs" is not quite idiomatic. A native speaker would be likely to say "enough eggs". Your parenthetic "which there wasn't|weren't" is redundant, since "Even if" already conveys the meaning that there were not enough eggs. Sufficient and stuff are in somewhat different registers. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Sep 15 '16 at 11:13
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    It is also possible to understand "which" as referring back to the existential statement not to the noun "eggs" in particular, and thus the singular "wasn't" would be acceptable. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Sep 15 '16 at 11:16
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    The redundancy isn't a problem, though. It adds emphasis. – snailcar Sep 19 '16 at 1:07
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I think a native speaker would understand, but it is gramatically correct to say "which there weren't".

I think this is because you can count eggs and say that eggs "were" or "weren't". Substitute in a mass noun like milk, then you should say that milk "was" or "wasn't".

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