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Imagine a lawyer is trying to prove a criminal's innocence. Judge listens to the lawyer's words and when the lawyer's statements end, the judge wants to say that the documents in hand deny the lawyer's claims and says e.g.:

  • Evidence say something else.
  • Evidence prove something else (they prove something exactly in spite of what you claim).

What is the best way to say the sentences above in a natural way?

Added: It is not at all opinion based in my view. I need to know how even one person in AE would say the same thing. I am not going to get lots of suggestions at all.

2

The set phrase is "the evidence proves otherwise". Here are some examples:

Why do some prosecutors try so hard to convict a person when all the evidence proves otherwise? - quora.com

Again, the evidence proves otherwise. - The Conversation

1

Although "evidence" is both singular and plural:

"Aha! The gun! Bag the evidence!"

and

The evidence proved he was guilty.

when the word is used in the way you describe, it is usually treated as singular:

[The] Evidence says something else.
[The] Evidence proves something else.

The first version is weaker; it implies that there was still some doubt.
The second version is stronger; something a judge would be more likely to say when passing a verdict.

1

refute means "to say or prove that a person, statement, opinion, etc. is wrong or false".

The documents refute your claim.

This sentence says that the documents prove that what the lawyer has said is incorrect.

contradict means "to be so different from another fact or statement that one of them must be wrong"

The documents contradict your claim.

This sentence means that the documents and the lawyer say different things, so either the documents or the lawyer must be incorrect. It does not suggest which one is right.

0

I think the word "contradict" or "be contrary to" or "contradictory" are used in such situation like:

Evidence is contrary to your claim

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