0

This sentence is from "Travel in Southeast Asia".

Bangkok is the capital of Thailand and is regarded as a shopper's paradise. Some of its restaurants stage cultural shows where one can enjoy the twin pleasures of Thai cuisine and classical dance.

What does where refer in this sentence?

1. at cultural shows.

2. at some of its restaurants.

3. at some of its restaurants and cultural shows.

I like #1 as where refers to the nearest place before it.

  • Without any doubt where is referring to some restaurants where cultural shows were staged. But I don't know what kind of grammatical structure this is. Dangling modifier? Not sure. But this sentence is fine as it is. – Man_From_India Sep 18 '16 at 1:58
  • 2
    Where is a relative word, but not a pronoun. Traditionally it would be a relative adverb, and in post-Jespersen grammar it's a relative preposition. – snailcar Sep 18 '16 at 2:10
1

Grammatically, where stands for cultural shows.

The structure: One can enjoy the twin pleasures of Thai cuisine and classical dance where? In or at cultural shows staged by some of Thailand's restaurants.

Note that the count noun restaurant should be plural, so some of its restaurants.

  • Can we enjoy cuisine at cultural shows? – learner Sep 18 '16 at 2:25
  • @learner I looked at the sentence grammatically; the author of the sentence is responsible for its logic. – Alan Carmack Sep 18 '16 at 5:00
0

Where is a relative adverb beginning a relative clause. It refers to the word shows. During these shows you can enjoy the twin pleasures of Thai cuisine and classical dance.

0

The word where is a very "loose" relative connector. It need not refer to a place. It can refer back to an activity, a performance, an opportunity, a time-frame, almost anything really.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.