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I am always confused between beautiful (ends with single L) and beautifull (ends with dabble L).

I noticed that in the dictionaries it's written with one L but maybe also the second form is correct and just not considered common and hence the dictionaries don't mention it.

In my phone automatic corrector both of the options do exist, and on Google I saw unclear answers for it. I would like to know a clear answer for this question.

closed as off-topic by Alan Carmack, Mari-Lou A, Peter, Nathan Tuggy, P. E. Dant Sep 19 '16 at 22:27

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    How many dictionaries online have you found the spelling beautifull in? – Alan Carmack Sep 19 '16 at 21:46
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    You should delete the option with two els from your phone automatic corrector thingie. – Alan Carmack Sep 20 '16 at 1:02
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Beautiful is the common spelling, "beautifull" appears to be a less common variant or probably just a misspelling which might derive from the adverbial form "beautifully":

  • mid-15c., "pleasing to the eye," from beauty + -ful. The beautiful people "the fashionable set" first attested 1964 in (where else?) "Vogue" (it also was the title of a 1941 play by U.S. dramatist William Saroyan). House Beautiful is from "Pilgrim's Progress," where it is a proper name of a place.

Ngram: beautiful vs beautifull

See also "Cambridge Advanced Learner's Dictionary" (p. 116): enter image description here

  • The spelling beautifull was an alternate in the 15th and 16th centuries (e.g. see Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy) but hasn't been accepted for 150 years or so. – P. E. Dant Sep 19 '16 at 22:30
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    @P.E. Dant - that is an interesting point that could have posted in an answer to a potentially good question instead of simply VTC it. – user5267 Sep 20 '16 at 5:01
  • The archaic spelling of this word probably has no connexion to the OP's question. Any such contempory spelling is more likely to be a back-formation from beautifully, as in your own answer. – P. E. Dant Sep 20 '16 at 5:35
  • @P.E.Dant - yes, I agree, but checking in Google the issue appears to be a common one, probably among NNS. So both my suggestion and your research could actually provide good reference for those who checked it in the future. IMO. – user5267 Sep 20 '16 at 5:44
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    @Mari-LouA - It is not only a question of spell-checker, OP clearly refers to the unclear information about the usage of double ll in beatiful in google (where actually there are a lot of sites which duscuss about it). A clear referened answer is always a good help. – user5267 Sep 20 '16 at 19:28

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