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There's a line from a video game:

There's Maya to think of in all of this, too. I can't just lay down my life. What in the world should I do?

Maya is a person's name. The man saying this is a lawyer. He'd to decide whether or not he should continue to defend for a boy. And Maya was in danger too and he didn't know if she's safe or not. If he chose to defend the boy, he would be risking his own life. If not, he can just walk away and go find Maya.

What I don't understand is the usage of "in all of this". I can't find the definition for this phrase anywhere.

  • You're not giving us much to go on. What would you like to know about that phrase? – Lawrence Sep 21 '16 at 4:22
  • @Lawrence I don't quite understand this sentence. Does the first part mean I need to think of Maya? And What does "in all of this" mean? – yyxkk Sep 21 '16 at 4:34
  • The first part means that you have to consider Maya (or her needs, safety, etc). The second means something like "in this situation". Your question quotes only one sentence. The context might be clearer if you expanded the quote to add a few more sentences before the one you quoted. – Lawrence Sep 21 '16 at 4:42
  • You're expected to provide more details, like where you found this, a link if possible, and a larger portion of the text. One sentence is not always enough to determine the meaning of a sentence or parts of a sentence. – Em. Sep 21 '16 at 5:16
  • @Max It's from a video game. The man who said this is a lawyer. He had to make a choice whether he should continue to defend for a boy. And Maya was in danger too and he didn't know if she's safe or not. If he decide to defend the boy, he may risk his own life. If not, he can just walk away and go find Maya. – yyxkk Sep 21 '16 at 5:31
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UPDATE based on edit RE: Maya being a person's name

"There's Maya to think of in all of this, too."

This means that whatever the circumstance being discussed, it's important to bear in mind the impact or opinions that Maya has.

So the person saying that is trying to stress you shouldn't be making a decision without considering Maya's interests. In this case it seems like perhaps someone is being asked to make a sacrifice on principle, and perhaps Maya is their wife/daughter/etc. So they are saying there's more to consider than just the principle...because she is important as well. If one were to sacrifice their life for this principle, she might be left alone as a result.


Prior to that being clarified:

Maya could be a person's name. And it's computer software for 3-D rendering. If you look at the disambiguation page on Wikipedia, there's a bunch of references:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maya

In terms of go-to for me, if you saw that sentence and it wasn't obvious from context (civilization, person, software), I'd assume it refers to the "illusion" concept:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Maya_(illusion)

Because that's the most "context-free" form of the word I'd imagine anyone using.

In other words, I'd default it as "you should be aware that what you're seeing might be an illusion, and the truth is deeper". But that involves a lot of presumption. Context is going to drive the interpretation of a word used to mean so many different things.

(Again, the "in all of this" being very contextual as well. Whatever the concern is in the surrounding text--the focus of the conversation.)

  • Sorry I didn't mention that before... Maya is actually a person's name. I've edited my question with more sentences from the context. – yyxkk Sep 21 '16 at 5:04
  • @yyxkk Ok, that clarifies. Edited. – HostileFork Sep 21 '16 at 5:11
  • Thank you so much! I'm wondering if there's a definition for "in all of this". Or could you please give me some examples so I can understand when to use it. – yyxkk Sep 21 '16 at 5:34
  • @yyxkk Well, often people would say "But what about Maya?" or "How would this affect Maya?" or "Have you thought about what impact it might have for Maya?" Invoking "in all of this" is really just--as others have told you--a way of saying "in regards to this", which would perhaps be more "proper". If someone has just told you a lot of things about big changes at the company where you work--new managers coming in--you might say in concern to your job: "Where do I stand in all of this?" It's not super common, but understood as "in regards to the current discussion". – HostileFork Sep 21 '16 at 5:38
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In the quoted sentence,

  • "all of this" refers to the drama or issues of the moment.

  • "in" is interchangeable with amid or out of [all the drama].

There's Maya to think of in all of this, too.

The person is saying that he'd also have to consider Maya, out of the greatest issues/problems at hand. She's also important — he can't be caught up in the moment and forget her.

I can't just lay down my life. What in the world should I do?


He'd to decide whether or not he should continue to defend for a boy. And Maya was in danger too and he didn't know if she's safe or not. If he chose to defend the boy, he would be risking his own life. If not, he can just walk away and go find Maya.

The man has two conflicting problems — (1) a boy needs defending, and (2) Maya is lost. Helping both is equally important to him. But he can only choose one option.

Let A = defend for boy,  
    B = find Maya.
  1. If he decides to do A, he can't look for Maya and might even die.
  2. If he decides to do B, the boy won't be defended and would possibly be in danger.

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