0

I have the following sentences.

Decomposition of data into simple blocks are presented by Lin (2013).

Lin (2013) illustrates that the data gaps can be manipulated with the symmetric constraints.

Can I combine them as follows?

Decomposition of data into simple blocks are presented by Lin (2013) and illustrates that the data gaps can be manipulated with the symmetric constraints.

I am not sure this is grammatically wrong, as the subject of second sentence is Lin, not the decomposition. (I think subject of the first sentence is decomposition of data.)

So, how should I correct this? I feel it should be "and he illustrates [that the …]."

  • 1
    Decomposition is, not decomposition are. – snailcar Sep 17 '13 at 10:10
  • Usually, you should be able to remove the part of a sentence in parentheses and still have a complete sentence. So I'd say by Lin (2013), not by (Lin, 2013). – snailcar Sep 17 '13 at 10:10
  • @snailboat usually yes, but formatting of references is often described in detail by stylebooks and some do things in awkward ways. – Peter Flom - Reinstate Monica Sep 17 '13 at 10:20
  • @snailboat: thank you for the comments. could you also tell me know how do i combine these 2 sentences. – gnp Sep 17 '13 at 10:21
3

I would say:

Decomposition of data into simple blocks is presented by Lin (2013), which illustrates that data gaps can be manipulated with the symmetric constraints.

I would also say:

Lin (2013) illustrates that, in the decomposition of data into simple blocks, the data gaps can be manipulated with the symmetric constraints.

The difference is that in the second sentence the reference is immediately evident. You could use one or the other sentence depending on what you would want to highlight.

1

How about:

Lin (2013) presents methods of deconstructing data into simple blocks and illustrates how data gaps can be manipulated with symmetric constraints

  • thanks. does this=> ... methods of deconstructing .... or method of deconstructing ...? – gnp Sep 17 '13 at 10:28
  • Either "a method" or "methods" would be grammatical. Does Lin present more than one method? (You would need "a" if it's only one method) – Peter Flom - Reinstate Monica Sep 17 '13 at 10:39

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.