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I have the following sentences.

Object models are reconstructed in the final step.

In the final step, two different approaches are basically found: method A and method B.

I am not sure about what the most appropriate way to combine these two sentences is.

Object models are reconstructed in the final step, from which, two different approaches are basically found: model driven and data driven.

Should it be from which, for which, or something else?

  • Object models are reconstructed in the final step, WHERE two different approaches are basically found: model driven and data driven. – Serguei Shimansky Sep 17 '13 at 21:50
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I would use the following sentence, since the two approaches are for the final step. To me, from which would mean that the two approaches follow the final step.

Object models are reconstructed in the final step, for which two different approaches are basically found: model driven and data driven.

Using a different verb, I could use which.

Object models are reconstructed in the final step, which uses two different approaches: model driven and data driven.

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I think it depends on what you are trying to say.

You may mean that it was from the process of reconstructing object models in the final step that you ascertained that two basic approaches exist, which you are labelling A and B.

OR you may mean that you always knew that there were two basic approaches, and it was when you got to the final step of reconstructing object models that you were going to apply them.

In the first case, "from which" appears most suited; in the second case, "for which". You may need to re-word slightly to make it clearer how methods A and B are derived.

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