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Source

As they all walk towards the elevators the kid starts going on about how he will be old enough to join a crew next year and that he wants to serve aboard the Nebuchadnezzar.

Author used this words: Kid starts going on...

My understanding: Does kid thinking about himself or asking somebody that he is old enough to join with the crew?

I was confused, Can anyone help me how to understand this sentence?

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    "Go on about" means to talk (incessantly) about something without caring if other people are uninterested in what you are saying. – Mick Sep 23 '16 at 3:46
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  1. go on
    to talk in an annoying way about something for a long time:
    He went on and on until I finally interrupted him and told him I had to go.
  2. go on
    to talk so much that people become bored or annoyed

About indicates the topic. So the kid starts talking in an annoying manner about "how he will be old enough to join a crew next year and that he wants to serve aboard the Nebuchadnezzar."

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As @MickSharpe has pointed out, to

go on about something

is to talk about it, for a long time, usually in an animated way.

What is happening in your passage is that the kid is talking about how things will be better for him next year (when he is older). One pictures a young boy gushing with enthusiasm. You could substitute "go on about" with

talking about

the kid starts talking about how he will be old enough...

without loss of understanding.

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