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Source

"Designing vulgar structures is typical of that architect."

Where are the following parts of speech are located: Subject, AVP/LVP, DO, IO, Subject Complement

Edit:
Designing and is are both verbs. Designing - Action Verb; Is - Linking Verb. I know that if there are two verbs, you go with the second verb. So,
"Designing vulgar structures is (LVP) typical of that architect."

The subject confuses me because both structures and architect are nouns. In my opinion, since is is the LVP, the subject could be architect. So,
"Designing vulgar structures is (LVP) typical of that architect (S)."

What I don't know is where the DO and IO are located. This sentence does not have a prepositional phrase, so it could (probably does) include both DO & IO.

Sorry if there is some confusion, English is not my native language.

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    Welcome to ELL. Please use the edit link to tell us where you think those parts of speech are in your sentence. If we know what exactly what you don't understand, we can help you. Please review our tour and Help Center pages for advice on writing a good question. Sep 25 '16 at 2:52
  • "Designing" is a gerund here; that might be a useful hint. Was it you who asked this question at Brainly.com, or are you answering it? Either way, you should always add a link to the source (when possible) if quoting text in a question. Sep 25 '16 at 3:12
  • @P.E.Dant I was the one who asked the question at Brainly.com .... Didn't help me much for nobody answered. What about the things that I think are the part of the sentence? Are they correct or not? Sep 25 '16 at 3:25
  • What kind of phrase is of that architect? Sep 25 '16 at 3:27
  • Prepositional phrase. Sep 25 '16 at 3:28
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"Designing vulgar structures is typical of that architect."

  • "Designing" is a subject (gerund)
  • "vulgar structures" (direct object, NP)
  • "is" (linking verb or predicator)
  • "typical of that architect" (subject complement where typical is an adjective and of that architect is an indirect object or a prepositional NP.)

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