2

I learned that we can't place the indeterminate article 'a' or 'an' in front of an uncountable noun.
For example, a bread, an information, are both incorrect.

But I think that we can put 'a' or 'an' in front of uncountable nouns when the situation is allowed.

Like this,

I saw a love on the desk.

What do you think about this?

  • 1
    It is ungrammatical with the 'a' and doesn't make any sense without it. What meaning are you trying to communicate? – Mick Sep 25 '16 at 6:20
  • 1
    By Thomas Hardy. I have a love I love too well / Where Dunkery frowns on Exon Moor; / I have a Love I love too well, / To whom, ere she was mine, / 'Such is my love for you,' I said, / 'That you shall have to hood your head / A silken kerchief crimson-red, / Wove finest of the fine.' – Mari-Lou A Sep 25 '16 at 6:57
  • A love is wrong . It's an abstract noun that you can never count. But when it comes to a noun phrase that when love describe a noun "A love story" for example. It's correct because you can count stories – user178049 Sep 25 '16 at 13:10
4

If the sentence had been

I saw a love (of mine) in the street

That would have been fine. It would mean I saw an ex-lover walking down the street.

The expression a love refers to a lover

Oxford Dictionaries defines the noun love as

3 [COUNT NOUN] A person or thing that one loves.

  • ‘she was the love of his life’
  • ‘their two great loves are tobacco and whisky’

Thomas Hardy's The Sacrilege contains the following lines

"I have a Love I love too well
Where Dunkery frowns on Exon Moor;
I have a Love I love too well,
To whom, ere she was mine,
'Such is my love for you,' I said,
'That you shall have to hood your head
A silken kerchief crimson-red,
Wove finest of the fine.'

Note that Love is spelled with a capital letter. It is a term of endearment, a name to call your spouse, or sweetheart.

Unfortunately, I saw a love on the desk makes little sense to me, it sounds as if a person saw their lover standing on top of a desk; it's not physically impossible, but it is highly unlikely.

A more plausible sentence would be:

I saw a silver framed photo of a loved one on a desk.

  • +1. Maybe it was a ♥ carved into the desk. The symbol is often labeled "love". That might mislead a learner. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Sep 25 '16 at 12:58
  • @TRomano Oh, I hadn't thought of that. But would you say: I saw a heart on the desk? (she envisions a ripped out human heart dripping blood on the desk), maybe not.... – Mari-Lou A Sep 25 '16 at 13:02
  • The heart could have been written on the desk with true love's indelible Sharpie. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Sep 25 '16 at 14:02
0

Your example is incorrect.

Love is a feeling. As a noun it's an intense feeling of deep affection or a person or thing that one loves. "babies fill parents with intense feelings of love." or "she was the love of his life".

As a verb: feel a deep romantic or sexual attachment to (someone). "do you love me?"

And yes, you can put 'a' or 'an' before uncountable nouns, and yes, it depends on situation. But that was discussed here.

I did a research for your example:

A Love (of) Supreme (www.gq.com)

I couldn't find anything else that is relating to your example. Because it doesn't make any sense. Don't you mean "make love"? Like: they made love on the desk.

P.S. Sorry for the formatting, I am new at StackExchange, and I haven't made any answers yet. I hope I helped.

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