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I want to say something like:

No one else could be this close of losing the race.

Is it grammatically correct?

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    we are close to VERB-ing not "close of " VERB-ing.
    – TimR
    Commented Sep 25, 2016 at 13:36

2 Answers 2

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"Close to losing" is correct and is commonly used.

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    Please edit to include an explanation of why this is correct; answers without explanation do not teach the patterns of the language well. Commented Oct 25, 2016 at 19:33
  • @P.E.Dant And I normally try to include such explanations. But in this case I'm hard pressed to say what the general rule is, so I tried to sneak through with a short answer.
    – Jay
    Commented Oct 25, 2016 at 20:52
  • You might note that close, when talking about proximity, takes a number of preps, e.g. to, on, upon, about, beside, behind, below, in, but never of. Commented Oct 25, 2016 at 21:00
  • @P.E.Dant Hey, if you can give a better answer, feel free. I readily admit this is not one of my best answers.
    – Jay
    Commented Oct 25, 2016 at 21:05
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    Not me! I'm lazier than you are. Commented Oct 25, 2016 at 21:06
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I think the correct form would be: "No one else could be this close to the loss of the race".

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  • Your sentence is correct, but "No one else could be this close to losing the race" is also correct.
    – Jay
    Commented Oct 25, 2016 at 18:56

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