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  1. With all his wealth, he has no joy in his life.

  2. Besides all his wealth, he has no joy in his life.

  3. Despite of all his wealth, he has no joy in his life.

Actually it appeared in an exam and their answer key is showing the first one as the correct answer, but I don't think so. Please clarify.

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  • 3
    All three are grammatically correct but they mean different things. "With" in the first is used to mean "In spite of" and means much the same as number 3. The second (meaning "aside from") indicates that his only joy in life is his wealth. I prefer "Despite" to "Despite of" but others don't. – Ronald Sole Sep 25 '16 at 16:17
  • The third choice is not grammatically incorrect English. Despite of uses despite in its archaic meaning as a noun. Despite is itself a preposition here, rendering the preposition of superfluous. Without the preposition of, the third choice is grammatical. Without knowing exactly how the question was posed, it is impossible to say what "correct" means here. I suspect that the question asks for the best answer (or that the exam was written by a non-native speaker.) – P. E. Dant Sep 25 '16 at 21:51
  • "Despite all of his wealth, he has no joy in his life" is the simplest change you can make to (3) to make it correct. "Despite his wealth, he has no joy in life" is probably how I'd say it ("all of" and "his" seem redundant). – barrycarter Sep 25 '16 at 22:40
1

Broadly, all are wrong.

“With all his wealth, he has no joy in his life” is a mistaken version of two alternatives:

“With all his wealth, he has no joy in life”

“With all his wealth, there is no joy in his life”

The same is true in both the other sentences.

“Besides all his wealth, he has no joy in life” presents two problems:

If “Beside(s)” was appropriate “Beside”, not “Besides” would be needed.

Either way, neither “Beside” nor “Besides” is negative, as for instance “In
spite of…”; both mean, roughly, something positive like “As well as…”

“Despite of all his wealth, he has no joy in life” is a mistaken version of two alternatives:

“Despite all his wealth, he has no joy in life / there is no joy in his
life”

“In spite of all his wealth, he has no joy in life / there is no joy in his
life”

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