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I wrote:

For example, if a variable must be set to #exData, a post-assignment is required because #exData for a node is initially empty and will be filled after visiting all the child nodes.

#exData is defined for each node separately and it is initially empty for that node. I am not sure about the position of "for a node". Did I use it correctly?

Also I don't know if before because I need comma or not.

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    How about "because a node's exData property" instead of for a node? Also, what is doing the visiting? – Tᴚoɯɐuo Sep 30 '16 at 14:12
  • @TRomano yes, a node's exData is much better. Please also say your opinion about my confusions beside your suggestions. It may be needed for other sentences. Now, I don't know if "#exData for a node" is totally wrong or not. – Ahmad Sep 30 '16 at 14:17
  • @TRomano there is a function which is called recursively with every node. then by visiting I mean calling the function on a node. – Ahmad Sep 30 '16 at 14:18
  • How about "...is initially empty and is filled after all the child nodes have been visited". Is the filling a one-time occurrence that happens after the final child node has been visited? – Tᴚoɯɐuo Sep 30 '16 at 16:05
  • exData for a node is not wrong but unclear. The preposition for isn't as clear as the possessive "a node's..." – Tᴚoɯɐuo Sep 30 '16 at 16:07
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I will give you a minimalist answer to your specific questions.

"For example, if a variable must be set to #exData, a post-assignment is required because #exData for a node is initially empty and will be filled after visiting all the child nodes."

#exData is defined for each node separately and it is initially empty for that node. I am not sure about the position of "for a node". Did I use it correctly?

The position is fine. It could be clearer to write "for a particular node".

Also I don't know if before because I need comma or not.

Optional. A good way to decide is to read the sentence out loud, and see whether you think pausing at that spot makes it easier or harder for the listener to follow what you're saying. If you desire a pause, use a comma. If you feel a pause there breaks up the flow too much, omit the comma.

Sorry, one other comment: it might be helpful to insert only as follows: "... and will only be filled after visiting all the child nodes."

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What I believe you are trying to express is

1) #exData is a property of a node object
2) #exData's value is initially empty (possibly nil?)
3) #exData's value is set during some form of a callback

in this case

for a node

is understandable and correct. What possibly makes your description confusing is

if a variable must be set to #exData...

which maybe should read

if a value must be set for #exData...

since from your description #exData is the variable (object property) which is assigned a value, not that a variable is assigned the value "#exData". You could then use

#exData's value is initially empty...

  • Thank you, but the variable is correct. It is another variable which is set to the value of the #exData variable. (We have assignment of a variable to another variable) but when the variable on the right is empty the assignment is not meaningful. – Ahmad Sep 30 '16 at 19:05

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