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A question for Mormons. Would you support a polygamous relationship over a monogamous one?

Question for Mormons. Would you support a polygamous relationship over a monogamous one?

Both of the sentences are very commonly used. Is there any difference between the two? Can they be used interchangeably?

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    What is the context? Is this the proposed title of an essay, a headline for a newspaper or blog? Neither is a complete sentence as written. More information, please. :-) Oct 1 '16 at 18:04
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    Are you sure that it's not "Questions for Mormons"?
    – Mick
    Oct 1 '16 at 18:15
  • @MickSharpe That's a typo. Oct 1 '16 at 18:17
  • @MarkHubbard provided more context. Oct 1 '16 at 18:18
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    Do mean using the article a before question? I think you need to put a before question here. There's just one sense in which question can be uncountable and that's where you mean doubt as in call sth into question. Ofcourse there are also some expressions that question can be used without an article as in without question, or good question but these are idiomatic expressions. Here actually you're proposing a question (an interrogative statement) so I think using an article is necessary. I haven't heard question for someone as in your answer.
    – Yuri
    Oct 1 '16 at 19:02
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Both work. In both cases, you could think of the first sentence as being similar to a heading, title or subtitle. That is especially true of the second version.

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