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I'm wondering if 'This is the bus for which i waited ' is correct.

If "for" should be located only after the verb, 'waited', can u plz explain why?

In my understanding, only phrasal verb should be put together and "wait for"is not a phrasal verb but preposition,meaning it can be positioned before which.

Is there any book i can get some reference?

migrated from english.stackexchange.com Oct 7 '16 at 18:11

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  • Are you asking whether prepositional phrases can immediately follow non-phrasal verbs? (That would "put together" the verb and the preposition.) The answer is yes: I waited for the bus. – deadrat Oct 7 '16 at 9:24
  • @deadrat Alice J wants support for separating "waited" and "for", as in the example sentence. – MetaEd Oct 7 '16 at 18:11
  • @MetaEd I was confused by "only phrasal verb should be put together". – deadrat Oct 7 '16 at 18:38
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"To wait for" can be a phrasal verb. As a native English speaker, I would say

This is the bus [that] I waited for.

(I would usually omit the word "that," but it is understood).

Your original sentence is also a correct way to phrase it, but it sounds very formal.

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