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How can I express my thought about serving the table AND setting something on it? Is it right?

I served the table with soup and pasta.

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  • You serve your guests with soup and pasta, not the table.
    – Mick
    Commented Oct 11, 2016 at 23:57
  • I set the table with soup and pasta. I lay the table with soup and pasta. is it correct? Also, is "The success of a party dinner in many aspects depends on capacity beautifully and correctly serve the table" correct? If it is, then why can't I use it with a preposition?
    – Ilya
    Commented Oct 12, 2016 at 0:09
  • You can set food on a table and you can set food before guests, but you cannot set a table with food, only with non-food items (cutlery, china, linen). I don't know why.
    – Mick
    Commented Oct 12, 2016 at 0:20
  • I set the table with silverware and plates. ... ... I serve the guests (with) soup and pasta. ("With" can be omitted in the second sentence.) We call a place at the table with a plate, silverware, glasses or cups, bowls, and so forth a place setting. Commented Oct 12, 2016 at 1:08
  • "The success of a party dinner in many aspects depends on capacity beautifully and correctly serve the table" includes too many errors to be addressed in comments, I'm afraid. We could rewrite it for you, but that would not help you or later users of our site. Commented Oct 12, 2016 at 1:13

1 Answer 1

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I served the table with soup and pasta.

There's nothing wrong with the sentence; it's correct grammatically.

A table also refers to the people sitting at it. So the sentence implies that you served the people sitting at it with soup and pasta. On the other hand, the phrase "set/lay the table" doesn't convey this sense. It means to put a cloth, knives and forks, etc. in preparation for a meal.

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    Yes, it's grammatically correct and its use is prevalent in the hospitality industry where a server may inform his colleagues or manager that he/she "served the table with soup and pasta"...and then took the order for desserts. Commented Oct 12, 2016 at 7:16

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