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What is the correct grammatical way to ask my question, when I mean to ask about the place (in embriology) that the organ is derived from?

a) Where is the stomach derived from?

b) What is the stomach derived from?

c) Where the stomach is derived from?

d) What the stomach is derived from?

  • I don't understand why someone would use passive voice as well as the verb "derive" in such a context. Perhaps, I didn't understand the context. Would you please tell me what you want to imply, in plain English. – Cardinal Oct 13 '16 at 0:09
  • It's used to talk in such way in embryology, which deals with the first development of the organs in the embryo. – Judicious Allure Oct 13 '16 at 0:17
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With exception of particular cases, like (assuming there is an implicit subject given by the context)

  1. When you want to ask for confirmation on if (that is the place) where the stomach is derived from (for C)

or

  1. When you want to ask for confirmation on if (that is the thing (be it an organ)) which the stomach is derived from (for D)

C) and D) don't seem to be formulated correctly.

A) and B) seem more appropiate for your situation. The criteria for choosing one of them is whether the organ derives from a place or body region or a thing or organ. We use where for places and what for things, so A would be correct if you're asking about a place, and B is your choice if you're asking about a thing.

Hope I was of service

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  • So actually for my question the answer is B, since in embryology it's used to talk on one of the germ layers (things/organs). Thank you. – Judicious Allure Oct 13 '16 at 0:38

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