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How is "among others" used properly? Is it used properly in this sentence?:

I have among others worked in a bakery and a restaurant

I've looked at the definition of it. It says:

used to indicate that there are several more people like the one or ones mentioned, but that you do not intend to mention them all

Does that mean I can't use it when it's not people I am talking about?

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    Possible duplicate of The usage of "among others"? – Andrew Oct 18 '16 at 15:57
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    @Andrew, this is not a duplicate of the question you quoted. It asks whether you can use "among others" about things, which the answers to the question you quoted do not answer satisfactorily. – JavaLatte Oct 18 '16 at 16:36
  • @JavaLatte I'm not going to quibble since this really belongs more on meta, but I'm confused because, if you look at the top answer for that question, it gives two examples, both of which are about people. So it felt like I couldn't add anything meaningful to this question which wouldn't simply reiterate the answer to that question. – Andrew Oct 18 '16 at 16:58
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    Yes @Andrew, the top answer does give two examples about people, because the other question doesn't ask about things. This question specifically asks about things. – JavaLatte Oct 18 '16 at 17:27
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The expression among others is mainly used about people, but it can also be used about things. Here are some examples:

The American longshore workers held work stoppages in relationship to South African apartheid, the war in Vietnam, and the war in Iraq, among others. In the interest of others

The same dish is found in several Latin American countries (Costa Rica, Mexico,and Cuba among others). Building bridges among the BRICs

The risk associated with RYGB may include incisional hernias, nutrient deficiencies, marginal ulcers, pulmonary embolism, small bowel obstruction and wound infection, among others. Acceptability of weight loss treatments...

The key to its successful use for things is to include it at the end of a list that includes at least three items. To make your sentence work, you would have to say:

I have worked in a bakery, a cafe, and a restaurant, among others.

  • I don't know if the list really requires three items to work, but the rest of this is correct and helpful advice. – Nathan Tuggy Oct 18 '16 at 18:22
  • What would be an alternative to use besides among other? – surfmuggle Jul 5 '17 at 0:55
  • @surfmuggle, you could use et cetera, which means and the rest. The meaning isn't quite the same though. – JavaLatte Jul 5 '17 at 6:10
  • @JavaLatte thanks for your reply, would et cetera fit in this context:The site in question has these header fields among others - meaning that these are only a part of the fields (an extract? a sub quantity / sub portion?). Does sub portion or sub quantity fit better for discrete / heterogeneous things? – surfmuggle Jul 5 '17 at 8:20
  • @surfmuggle: I don't think that et cetera works in that example. The specified header fields have a particular importance to the point being made, and the other fields do not. et cetera would be OK if you were providing a random selection of header fields, and the et cetera fields have the same relevance as the ones that you refer explicitly to. – JavaLatte Jul 7 '17 at 6:21
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No, it doesn't. It's a perfectly good usage. There are lots of examples of "among others" used as you suggest found in the BYU Corpus. Here's one:

Mr. Easterbrook -- who writes for The New Republic, The Atlantic Monthly, ESPN.com., and this magazine, among others discusses...etc

But note that the sentence makes clear the category of thing (publications)

So I'd suggest adding a phrase that makes that clear, for example,

David works at several retail stores, among them, a bakery.

As an aside, the word "among" typically denotes more than two things, so if David only works at a bakery and one other place, I would revise.

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