1

When you want to say do as you already planned or make a plan happen, do you say do the plan, follow the plan, etc? I'm not sure what verb to use before plan to make that meaning. I think Follow the plan is a common collocation but it doesn't imply getting something done; I feel it describes the process at any point, so it doesn't make the meaning I intend to make.

I'm not sure I can [the verb] my plan.

What verb can I put there?

2

With "plan" the verb would be "implement". We implement a plan.

I'm not sure we can implement the plan.

I'm not sure the plan can be implemented.

I'm not sure we can put the plan into effect.

I'm not sure the plan can be put into effect.

I'm not sure we can carry out the plan.

I'm not sure the plan can be carried out.

I'm not sure we can follow through with the plan.

I'm not sure the plan can be followed through with.

  • Thanks, is there an easier option, too? Honest, I want to explain the meaning of might for a possible plan to a kid. – Yuri Oct 19 '16 at 10:56
  • What is "easier" is often in the eye of the beholder. Put...into effect uses smaller words, but it's more difficult in that it is not a single word but a phrase. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Oct 19 '16 at 10:57
  • Yea, I guessed so. BTW +1 :) – Yuri Oct 19 '16 at 10:59
  • 2
    I like carry out myself. Native speakers may avoid such verbs in writing (because they were taught to do so) but in speech, they are everywhere. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Oct 19 '16 at 11:00

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