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What does the sentence for the native English speaker mean?

  • The dog has stood there for a year.

Does it mean that it is still standing there? Or it means that it has been there for a year and now it is gone, dead or else?

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It definitely sounds like the dog is still standing there.

The dog has stood there for a year - it continues to stand there.

Although I would be more likely to say:

The dog has been standing there for a year - it continues to stand there.

If I wanted to say that the dog wasn't standing there any more, both sentences are the same but with had:

The dog had stood there for a year - it no longer stands there.

The dog had been standing there for a year - it no longer stands there.

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  • As a side note, since no animal will stand in place for a year, the natural assumption is "the dog" is a statue (like the famous Hachiko statue in Tokyo. It's fine to stay a statue stands somewhere, that's just common English metaphor.
    – Andrew
    Commented Oct 19, 2016 at 22:43

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