0

I have a sentence as follow:

Keep in mind that most self-help book is only good as a source of inspiration, not as an exact reference, and nothing complicated should be tried until you master the basics.

What does "nothing complicated should be tried until you master the basics" mean in this sentence? Does it mean "you should have no problem trying until you master the basics"?

2
  • Do you understand just the phrase "nothing complicated should be tried until you master the basics."?
    – John Feltz
    Oct 20, 2016 at 16:26
  • Please edit your post to include what do you think "nothing complicated should be tried" means, or explain why it confuses you.
    – Em.
    Oct 20, 2016 at 16:29

2 Answers 2

1

and nothing complicated should be tried until you master the basics.

The passive voice allows the writer to avoid explicitly stating the subject of the sentence. However, this means it can be confusing for the very reason that it's useful. In this sentence "should be tried" is passive. If you are confused, try changing it to the active voice, making your best guess what the subject is.

should be tried = [you] should try

To unpack the next layer:

"Nothing complicated" = "Not anything complicated"

Putting it together:

"nothing complicated should be tried" = "you should not try anything complicated [until ...]"

0
0

"Nothing complicated should be tried" is a passive voice construction.

The second part of that sentence could be rewritten as:

"..., and don't try anything complicated until you master the basics."

Which makes logical sense.

0

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .