1

I've been told that being+past participle is tenseless.

Even if it's tenseless, there must be some rules for it too. Does it convey the reason for an action, or does it mean that one action is followed by another?

  1. Being helped by Ram, I did my homework.
    (Meaning: I was helped by Ram and I did my homework. Or, because I was helped by Ram, I did my homework. Which meaning does it convey?)

I have also been told that being+adjective is used to show the reason for the action in the main clause.

  1. Being employed in teachings at a school, I hardly managed time for painting.
    (does it show the 'reason'?)

Does "being+past participle" also show the reason?

Being + past participle ---> Being + helped/employed

3

The present participle plus past participle is understood to supply the reason or basis for the action in the matrix clause. The combination of participles expresses a fact and the fact is understood to be pertinent to the action taken, or to the situation undergone, by the subject of the independent clause.

Being stressed by the idiocy of her obstructionist coworkers, she took a much-needed vacation.

Feeling stressed by the idiocy of her obstructionist coworkers, she took a much-needed vacation.

She got a blister on her heel, having walked too far in her new shoes.

Having heard that the quarterly meeting in London had been postponed, she phoned the airline to change her flight.

With an adjective in place of the past participle, the dependent clause expresses a state that applies to the subject at the time of the action or situation given in the independent clause. With being or feeling, it too may be understood as the reason or basis of that action or situation.

Feeling blue, she sang a sad song.

Being tall, she joined the volleyball team.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.