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The Plaintiff further averred that on or about 19.12.1992 the Defendant had encroached upon the said Lot 3 which was part of his land and thereby prevented the Plaintiff from having access to his land.

Please explain me what is the meaning of having access?

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  • If you have access to somewhere, that just means you're able to go there. It doesn't really make much sense to me in the cited context (just because someone is trespassing in your garden doesn't normally imply you can't go into the garden too), but that's legalese for you. But perhaps the "encroachment" involved putting up buildings, fences, or similar. – FumbleFingers Oct 21 '16 at 15:11
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    Where did you find this quote? What research have you performed already? In other words, Details, please... – J.R. Oct 21 '16 at 15:49
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Having access means you have the ability or clearance to do something.

In this case, the plaintiff was not able to use or enter the plot of land that the defendant had encroached upon and therefore did not have access to the land.

Another example of this is having the ability to unlock a door. If you have a key to a door, then you have access to the room the door leads into.

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= entering "and thereby prevented the Plaintiff from entering his land..."

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  • We expect answers to provide a bit more detail than this, for example references to back up your answer. In this case, a link to a definition for access might be useful. – JavaLatte Oct 21 '16 at 17:29
  • Having access does not necessarily mean entering. "Being able to enter" would be more appropriate, although it has the same syntax (using a gerund). – laugh salutes Monica C Oct 21 '16 at 20:18

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