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Here's an audio file. In number three (1:25) a woman seems to be speaking to her secretary. From what I understand she says:

Also could you bring the file on the Rx accounts?

According to Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary:

  • on: about, e.g. a book on South Africa
  • Rx: the written abbreviation for a doctor’s prescription
  • account: a written record of money that is owed to a business and of money that has been paid by it, e.g. to keep the accounts up to date

The meaning of each word seems to be clear. However, I don't understand the meaning of the whole phrase.

P.S. Just a guess: can RX be a proper noun in this context?

  • Possiblly "Rx" is being used as an abbreivation for "receive" but that is just a guess. – Peter Green Oct 22 '16 at 0:53
  • I'm guessing that the people who wrote the script invented a company or department called R-X without thinking of ℞ or RX (meaning "receive"), they just thought it was a cool-sounding name. – Malvolio Oct 22 '16 at 1:18
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I also hear "Also could you bring the file on the Rx accounts?" and the information you have provided is accurate.
The speaker is making a request. She is asking the secretary for the file "on Rx accounts". I also hear "Rx", but I am not convinced that this is correct. It might be some kind of special business lingo, a surname or a fake company name like "Arix Company".

Anyway, the file on X accounts means the file regarding/about X or the file that contains the transactions with X. In X accounts, X is a noun that modifies accounts. So, the file on Rx accounts likely means the file with the transactions regarding prescriptions. Maybe the speaker runs a pharmaceutical company, for example. If we pretend it's a company name or surname "Arix", then Arix accounts would be accounts regarding the transactions the speaker makes with Mr./Mrs. Arix (or the Arix Company). Think of "Smith" if "Arix" doesn't make sense.

  • "a fake company name like 'Arix Company'" The same thing seems to happen in number five (2:24), where a woman is talking to a bank teller: American Expense traveler's checks. – Mori Oct 21 '16 at 19:35
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    I don't know why I spelled it as "Arix" since "Arex" seems closer. Anyway, now that you mention it, it's possible that Arex (short for American Expense) is a parody/fake version of Amex (American Express). Textbooks seem to do this--making fake/pretend companies of real companies to use in their textbook world. Anyway, whatever Rx/Arex is, that's not too important as long as you understand general idea. – Em. Oct 21 '16 at 20:19
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You are correct and Rx (actually the symbol: ℞, representing the Latin imperative verb, recipe = take, take thou) refers to a doctor's prescription, or (sometimes) to prescription medicine and/or pharmacies. So the "Rx accounts" are some kind of records that relate to doctors' prescriptions, or possibly pharmaceuticals/pharmacies in general.

I can't tell what exactly she means without more context, or even if it's important to know more detail, but it seems like you already have a good enough general idea to understand the sentence.

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on: about, e.g. a book on South Africa

I belive this interpretation is correct.

Rx: the written abbreviation for a doctor’s prescription

First I have heard that, in my world Rx is an abbreviation for "Receive" but as with lots of two letter words/acronyms it can likely mean many different things in different contexts.

a written record of money that is owed to a business and of money that has been paid by it, e.g. to keep the accounts up to date

Likely yes.

P.S. Just a guess: can RX be a proper noun in this context?

Very possible.

The meaning of each word seems to be clear. However, I don't understand the meaning of the whole phrase.

The business has a "file" (collection of records) which it refers to as "RX accounts". The boss wants the secretary to bring it for him.

Anything beyond that is essentially speculation on the internal business practices of the business in question.

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