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Here is a sentence which I think an example of passive participle clause:

  1. After being arrested, he was taken to the police station.

I think the above sentence with 'being+p.p' is an example of passive participle clause. Is that sentence is formed through the following process ?

Active: After the police arrested him, the police took him to the police station.

passive: After he was arrested by police, he was taken to the police station.

passive participle clause: After Being arrested, he was taken to the police station.

"After he was arrested" changed into=After being arrested Am i right here ?

Here is a sentence where I have removed "after":

Being arrested, he was taken to the police station.

Is this sentence meaningfull ?

Does it imply 'He was arrested and taken to the police station or Because he was arrested he was taken to the police station or He was being arrested and taken to the police station?

How the passive participle clause are formed?

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Yes, it seems you are getting a pretty good grasp on this grammar structure, and all of your sentences are grammatically correct. The only one where I would suggest a change:

Being arrested, he was taken to the police station.

To my ears, this sounds more natural:

Being under arrest, he was taken to the police station.

The meaning is simply that the second part is a natural consequence of the first part:

Being underage, he wasn't allowed to enter the pub.

Having won the round, he didn't have to compete again until the next day.

As with the answer to this same question over at the English Language & Usage site, it's far more important how well you communicate what you want to say rather than if you can properly employ quirky grammar. You will want to use the passive participle clause at the start of a sentence for special emphasis, and not just because you can.

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  • As I've modified the question in ELU This question different than that question
    – yubraj
    Oct 22 '16 at 7:00
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Here's my take on this:

  • After being arrested, he was taken to the police station.

Yes, after being arrested means: after he was arrested.

  • Being arrested, he was taken to the police station.

That is not ungrammatical, but "as he was arrested" or "after being arrested" would be preferable as the action is what is important

Now, there are times, we really want to use being to underscore a state or condition:

  • Being enthusiastic, he stood up and shouted.
  • Not being in tune with what people were saying, he walked out of the room.
  • Being ill was not something he liked.

It is best used for states and conditions of a person or thing.

Participle clauses with be are formed using being plus the past participle:

  • Being chased around the yard was not a game my dog liked.
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After being arrested does indeed parse as a passive participial clause.

But being arrested does not: to me it has the structure being + adjective, which really only makes sense when the adjective describes a state. So Being arrested, he was taken to the police station is not natural (though it is comprehensible.

(Note that being arrested is fine as a nominal (gerund) clause: Being arrested was the thing he most feared.)

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