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The phrase only gives 14 results on Google. So, it makes me wonder if it is idiomatic or not.

Example sentence:

There isn't an appropriate place to break up. There neither exists a spot to stand after the ordeal.

EDIT:

Maybe this sounds more idiomatic?

There isn't an appropriate place to break up. Neither one to stay at* after the ordeal.

_* not sure if at is the correct preposition

(I think I'm convinced now that there neither existed is not idiomatic.)

  • Idiomatic? Is such a sentence commonly used by native English speakers? No. But it would easily be understood by most readers or listeners (providing it is preceded, as this is, by a sentence with a corresponding negative like isn't) and although it violates some prescriptivist decrees, it is not an impossible usage in English. – P. E. Dant Oct 23 '16 at 4:59
  • You may want to consider: "There isn't an appropriate place to break up. Neither does there exist a [safe] spot to stand after the ordeal." – Gary Botnovcan Oct 28 '16 at 21:22
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There neither exists a spot to stand after the ordeal.

I can't think of a sentence or situation where this works as written. The usual structure is "neither [A] nor [B]" and, while it's permissible to have the nor without the neither, neither must be paired in some way with a nor or a not. While there is a "not" in the first sentence, it's not really paired with the neither in the second, since they're talking about two different things.

Here's how you could write it:

There isn't an appropriate place to break up. There doesn't exist a spot to stand after the ordeal.

This sentence doesn't make any sense to me, because I don't understand how "breaking up" has to do with where you will stand afterwards, but it is grammatical.

Here's an example of one that does work (although it's very informal English):

There isn't an appropriate place to sit around here. Neither can you stand.

In this case "sit" and "stand" are related actions, so the comparison makes sense. You can also say this, which is more "proper":

There isn't an appropriate place to sit around here, nor can you stand.

Edit: As a side note, if I understand your intention correctly, you can write the sentence as:

There's never a "good" place to break up with someone -- but if you can, pick a place where you can make a easy getaway.

  • The sentence means, figuratively, that it's never feels okay to break up. – alex Oct 23 '16 at 4:40
  • @alex right, I get that. If I understand your intention, please see my edit to my answer. – Andrew Oct 23 '16 at 4:46
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Neither should be paired with nor:

There existed neither a spot to stand on nor a place to sit after the ordeal.

If you don't want to include an alternative, then you should use not:

There existed not a spot to stand on after the ordeal.

  • Technically aye, a prescriptivist would say, but nought requires that every neither have its nor in common speech. In the cited text, Neither clearly has its negative apposite in isn't in the preceding sentence. The meaning is clear (if the word order of the second sentence reads like a Google translation from the Slavo-Serbian.) – P. E. Dant Oct 23 '16 at 4:32
  • Oh, dear! I'm too tired to edit it right now. – Mick Oct 23 '16 at 4:39
  • You're right for Bo Peep and Uncle Ned then. – P. E. Dant Oct 23 '16 at 4:48
  • It's time to wind the cat up and put the clock out. – Mick Oct 23 '16 at 4:49

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