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Edited:

Once somewhere I read a sentence (I don't remember where),but I note that down.

  • He has drastically changed his facial appearance.

The text was talking about a guy who had changed his look (by makeup or something like that and had transformed his human canvas into another character) in the manner that some people could not recognize him. The question is that if removing the adverb "drastically" from the sentence would make the sentence unidiomatic / unnatural or not. Actually, I've heard some native speakers use this sentence in this way and this is why it made me fall into doubt.

I would be thankful if you could help me with it.

  • It is an adverbial intensifier. There seems to be little else to say. – Mick Oct 23 '16 at 8:01
  • @Mick could you please give me some more explanation? It would help me a lot. :) – A-friend Oct 23 '16 at 9:31
  • The adverb drastically is similar in meaning to dramatically. What difference do you think exists between: Prices have risen dramatically and Prices have risen ? – Mari-Lou A Oct 23 '16 at 11:43
  • Hi @Mari-LouA. :) Thank you for beeing of help. Just to make my question clearer, I have no doubt about the meaning of this adverb. I'd like if removing it from the sentence would make the sentence unidiomatic / unnatural or not. Actually, I've heard some native speakers use this sentence in this way and this is why it made me fall into doubt. ;) – A-friend Oct 23 '16 at 12:38
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    Rather than facial appearance I would have said physical appearance was more idiomatic, but each to his own. If I say I have changed my appearance; ever so slightly; a bit; or drastically; it tells the listener the degree of change. Where's the problem? Try it out on native speakers and see their reactions :) – Mari-Lou A Oct 23 '16 at 12:58

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