3

Some sentences:

  • It takes as little as four seconds for a car thief to break into a car. (Or should it be as few as four seconds? Because seconds is countable)

  • You can fly to Paris for as little as 20 euros. (Or as few as 20 euros? Because euros is countable)

  • He drinks as much as three bottles of milk a day. (Or as many as three bottles of milk? Because bottle is countable)

  • The weather can change completely in as little as half an hour. (Or as few as a half an hour ... because hour is countable)

  • I could be back in as little as five days. (Or as few days as ... because days is countable)

I don't know why in the above examples we used 'little/much' instead of 'few/many'?

Am I wrong?

1

"Bottles of milk" can be interpreted as a quantity of milk (which is uncountable) as well as a number of bottles of milk (which is countable). In other words bottle can be a unit of measure as well as an object. It's just a quirk of English. You can use "as much as" or "as little as" in this case.

1

In the first and second sentence, 'as little as' is used to mean "a small amount, quantity, or degree".

In the fourth and fifth sentence, 'as little as' is used to mean "the minimum period of time".

It mostly conveys the meaning of only or just:

It takes only four seconds for a car thief to break into a car.

You can fly to Paris for only 20 euros.

The weather can change completely in just half an hour.

I could be back in just five days.

If the quantity/amount is lower, we use as little as. If it's higher we use as many as:

It takes as little as four seconds to start a car.

It takes as many as four days to fix a car.

Definition of as little as —

used to suggest that a number or quantity is surprisingly small.

Definition of as many as —

used to suggest that a number or amount is surprisingly large.

1
+50

As little as, as much as, as few as and as many as are idiomatic phrases.

The definitions in Merriam-Webster dictionary are:

  • As little as: used to suggest that a number or quantity is surprisingly small
  • As few as: used to suggest that a number or amount is surprisingly small
  • As many as: used to suggest that a number or amount is surprisingly large

But

  • As much as: used to say that two things are equal in amount or degree, or that an amount is as large as another amount; other meanings are "almost but not quite" and "even though".

As you can see, "as little as" is almost the same as "as few as", but the former can be used for a quantity while the latter can be used for an amount (see this question for the difference). These two are interchangeable in some cases. But all the examples you provided are related to continuous quantities, so "as few as" is not suitable. As a suitable example, you could say "In my math class there are as few as two girls".

However, "as much as" does not carry the same meaning - it is typically used in different contexts (which makes it much more common; see these Ngrams). Using "as much as" instead of "as many as" (as in your third example) may be considered correct, but it will likely create some confusion when the sentence is read, so I would suggest using "as many as" instead.

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