4

Sorry for bothering you again. In that book, I continue to meet a paragraph which is hard for me to understand. What do the highlighted words mean in the following context?

To “be” confident, straighten your back, which is easiest to do by balancing your head properly on the spine first. Interestingly, feelings of pride tend to emerge after you assume this physical stance, even though you have accomplished nothing, because feelings originate inside your body, not from the outside world.
With proper posture, you will already be standing taller than otherwise but you should plant your feet firmly on the ground as well, at roughly shoulder-width apart. This will allow you to assume an unyielding and balanced stance, which matches the unyielding personality of a man

What does "proper posture" mean here? Does it mean "your posture when you are confident"? and "you will already be standing taller than otherwise" mean "you will already be standing taller than when you don't have proper posture", right? And does word "but" (after "than otherwise") has a special meaning or has any relation to "otherwise"? I've searched on Google many times but I don't believe in my opinion. Thank for your help!

  • 2
    There is no need to be sorry in your posts. Just make sure to include your own thoughts regarding your question (and ideally any research you have done to answer it). Also, if possible, try to limit your post to one main/big question, and remember to take your time before accepting an answer. :) – Em. Oct 25 '16 at 4:53
5

Unless the author previously defined proper posture earlier in the text to have a special meaning, then I think proper posture is the same as "good posture". Here is an image I got from the post
How to retain a proper posture when sitting, standing, walking?
from Physical Fitness SE. image

So I think with proper posture means with good posture or using good posture, like in the example on the far right.

Yes, you are right about otherwise.

No, but does not have a special meaning or relation to otherwise here. It is the usual conjunction used to contrast clauses. An alternative to but in this sentence would be something like despite this or nevertheless.

With proper posture, you will already be standing taller than otherwise. Nevertheless, you should plant your feet firmly on the ground as well, at roughly shoulder-width apart.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.