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Can some explain whats the difference between the two in this context?

Person A: I wish I had that car.
Person B: Me too

VS

Person A: I wish I had that car.
Person B: Me either
  • @cardinal if neither and either mean the same thing, then yes its a duplicate. now the question is, do they mean the same? – Saad Lulu Oct 25 '16 at 11:55
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    When not used in a pair ("either this or that"), "either" is a negative polarity item, so it is used only with negatives and questions, not positive statements. So "me either." is not grammatical. In a question "Aren't you coming either?" or a negative "I'm not coming either", it is fine (but if the "not" is not expressed it takes the form "neither": "Me neither"). – Colin Fine Oct 25 '16 at 13:18
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    Possible duplicate of "Me neither" or "Me too"? – It's Over Oct 25 '16 at 19:38
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Two ways to say it in the declarative form:

Person A: I wish I had that car.

Person B: Me, too.

VERSUS

Person A: I wish I had that car. Person B: So do I.

Two ways to say it in the negative form.

Person A: I do not like soup for dinner.

Person B: Neither [or nor] do I.

OR Person B: Me either. [less formal]

Either can only be used in response to a NEGATIVE verb in the first sentence.

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"Me too" is correct. Either always introduces a pair of alternatives - Either X or Y. However, neither is probably OK to use:

  • Person A: I wouldn't buy that car.
  • Person B: Me neither.

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